The Beginner's Guide to Retargeting Campaigns [Free Ebook]

If you’ve heard of retargeting and think it’s a strategy you want to invest more in, you’re in good company.

According to a study by AdRoll, almost 90% of marketers are planning to increase or maintain their retargeting spend in the next year. Although it’s a popular tactic for marketers, if you’re new to retargeting, it can be tough to know how to get started.

In this article, we’ll cover the basics of retargeting and the ROI, lead generation, and lead conversion benefits it can bring to your marketing efforts. 

The following is an excerpt from The Beginner’s Guide to Retargeting, a free guide we created with the experts at Perfect Audience. If you’d like to access the full guide, click here.

In the old days of advertising, the name of the game was reach and frequency. Brands preferred mass media vehicles like television and radio because they were the easiest means to reach large audiences and build brand awareness.

Obviously, this meant the most effective advertising campaigns were dominated by the biggest brands with the largest marketing budgets.

Now, the reach and frequency model has been turned on its head. Increased media fragmentation and new tools for reaching people — like retargeting — have evened the playing field.

Even the smallest mom-and-pop-shop has opportunities to get in front of their target audience and drive awareness at a faster clip than some of the largest brands.

The Beginner's Guide to Re-Targeting - April 2017_Page_04_Image_0002.png

What Is Retargeting & Why Is It Beneficial?

If you were to look at your conversion funnel, how often would you find that a first-time visitor visited your website, viewed a product, and then made a purchase all on that first visit? Chances are you’d be lucky if you saw that behavior once.

Making a sale is a process. Studies have shown that up to 98% of your visitors  leave your website without converting. Another study on the conversion funnel by Google found that oftentimes, it takes several steps for a user to go from visit to conversion, and it’s actually not uncommon for a visitor to take more than 30 steps before making a purchase!

Retargeting helps you tackle this problem head on. It allows you to target and serve ads only to people who’ve previously visited your website, used your mobile app, or in some cases, visited and bought something from a physical retail location. This means you can be very strategic and efficient about who you’re reaching and where you’re spending your marketing budget.

Retargeting provides two primary benefits: It maximizes ROI and keeps you in front of prospects.

Marketers don’t often think of retargeting as a brand-building tool, but this represents a huge missed opportunity. One of the greatest benefits retargeting offers is that it keeps your brand front and center with a targeted audience.

Sometimes you might do this to try to drive a direct response, as we outlined in the section above. Other times, though, it also gives you an opportunity to build up your brand’s familiarity with your target audience and increase the likelihood of a future indirect action like a Google search or an organic site visit.

These indirect effects can be significant. In fact, comScore found that retargeting campaigns led to a 1046% increase in branded search and a 726% lift in site visitation after four weeks of retargeted ad exposure.

It’s a powerful direct response tactic that maximizes ROI.

In the environment of conversion funnel chaos mentioned above, no other advertising tactic offers the return that retargeting does. Retargeting offers the most direct and effective means to:

  • Reconnect with your highest value targets — people who’ve previously expressed interest in your offerings
  • Recapture their attention with an effective, compelling message
  • Move them further down the sales funnel

Ready to learn how to implement your own retargeting? Download your free guide here.

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Source: blog.hubspot.com/marketing

Internet Ad Spend Is About to Surpass TV Ad Spend [New Report]

internet-ad-spend-compressed.jpg

There are few things I look forward to more every year than the release of Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends Report.

It’s clear, it’s visually interesting, and most importantly, the results are always fascinating — with tremendous implications for marketers.

Meeker’s report is chock-full of data about how the way users operate online is changing. And man, are things changing. Voice queries are replacing the typical internet search, Netflix and other streaming services are replacing cable television, and social media is overtaking traditional cable TV habits.

Another way the internet is changing TV? Advertising. In her report, Meeker predicts that in 2017, spending on internet advertising will surpass spending on TV advertising for the first time — and eventually exceed $200 billion.

In this post, we’ll dive into how this change is taking place, and what the future of advertising looks like — in 2017 and beyond.

The State of Internet Advertising in 2017

Here’s a visualization of Meeker’s prediction — which also shows the rapid trajectory of internet advertising spend since the 1990s:

As you can see from Meeker’s slide, internet advertising spending will exceed $200 billion this year — beating TV advertising spending for the first time.

The magnitude of this can’t be overstated — the first television ad aired in 1941, and the first internet ad was placed in 1994. It took the internet only 24 years to disrupt and outpace the 76-year-old TV advertising industry — making it almost three times faster and more agile.

Meeker’s report also outlined where the bulk of internet advertising dollars are spent — and to nobody’s surprise, online advertising is growing at an explosive rate on Google and Facebook (20% and 62% year-over-year, respectively).

This data means that the online inbound marketing world is disrupting — and outpacing — the traditional outbound marketing world. But it’s reflective of other trends and changes, too.

What the Future of Online Advertising Looks Like

The Future of Online Advertising Is Mobile

Roughly half of all internet ad spending was on mobile advertising in 2016:

And that breakdown is no surprise — because people are spending more time online — and more time online on their phones — than ever before:

Meeker’s report highlights this trend — and points out the massive potential for growth in the mobile advertising space. There’s an opportunity for $16 billion worth of growth as the amount of mobile online advertising catches up to the time people are spending online on mobile devices:

This gap between time spent on mobile devices and money spent advertising specifically on mobile devices could be indicative of the relatively new mobile advertising space — advertisers might not yet know how to engage such a new swath of potential prospects.

But it could also be a result of the rapid rate at which mobile ads are reported and blocked, too. As it turns out, internet users — particularly on mobile devices — are quick to block ads they’re not interested in viewing:

There’s a huge opportunity for marketers and advertisers in the mobile online space, but it needs to be carefully and strategically done — so as not to irritate users enough for them to block those ads. We’ll surely continue to see more ads online — and on our smartphones.

The Future of Online Advertising Is Social

Google is eating up the majority of mobile advertising revenue dollars, but it’s followed closely by Facebook. What’s more, revenue from ads on Google and Facebook made up 85% of online advertising revenue in 2016:

So, as advertising spending and consumption shifts from TV to online, and specifically to mobile online, keep an eye on where ads start appearing online, too. Facebook online advertising revenue is growing faster than Google ad revenue at 62% year-over-year — and as it turns out, ads on Facebook drive direct purchases, too:

Mobile ads and targeted pins on Pinterest see high purchase rates, too: 

As users continue spending more and more online time within social media apps, advertisers will shift their strategy to create targeted, shoppable ads that live in social media feeds to keep users within apps and mobile devices and to make it easier for them to buy.

The Future of Online Advertising Will Be Closely Monitored

As the rates at which online and mobile ads are blocked by users indicate, many ads are perceived as obtrusive, disruptive, and unhelpful to many people. And it’s true — poor quality ads can drive people away from your site if they create a poor experience for your visitor.

Perhaps that’s why Google and Facebook have started taking steps to penalize publishers advertisers that create disruptive, misleading, and otherwise low-quality ad experiences on their platforms in recent years. Mobile and social media advertising offer a lot of opportunity for reward, but marketers and advertisers need to be mindful of the high stakes when they start creating. Pop-ups, overlays, and clickbait could get you penalized and blocked from future success, so stay tuned for more guidance on mobile marketing and social media advertising.

To download and review Meeker’s full Internet Trends Report, click here.

Where are you dedicating most of your digital advertising resources? Share with us in the comments below.

free guide: guide to mobile marketing

Source: Internet Ad Spend Is About to Surpass TV Ad Spend [New Report]
blog.hubspot.com/marketing

How to Analyze The Performance of Your Display Ads [Free Guide]

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Contrary to what you might think, display ads and inbound marketing aren’t inherently incompatible. In fact, applying inbound marketing principals to your display ad strategy can help maximize your potential reach and attract more qualified leads.

The key to creating “inbound-y” display ad campaigns is proper planning and positioning. In this article, we’ll cover how to define performance metrics for your display ads, set measurable goals, and ultimately analyze success.

Analyzing Ad Performance and Setting Goals

The following is an excerpt from Display Ads & Inbound Marketing, a free guide we created with our friends at AdRoll. If you’d like to access the full guide, click here.

Before you dive into building your first ad campaigns, you’ll need to ensure you understand what constitutes success for each ad, which performance indicators to track, and how to measure your progress in real time. In this section, we’ll help you do just that.

Setting Campaign Goals

One of the biggest mistakes marketers make when setting up a campaign is using the same success metrics for every stage. This causes a number of problems:

  • Under-investment in acquiring new customers
  • Over-investment in campaigns for customers who buy again and again regardless of marketing efforts
  • Limited investment in mid-funnel nurturing

Here are the key performance indicators (KPIs) you’ll need to track in order to measure the success of your campaigns.

Also known as the awareness stage, where prospects are looking for answers, resources, and research.

New site visitors: The number of new visitors who came to your site after you launched a campaign. This KPI helps you understand how successful your campaigns are at increasing brand recognition and overall site traffic.

Engagement: Engagement, including time spent on your site, or number of pages viewed, is a good indicator of the quality of new traffic to your site. Be sure to compare engagement on a product-by-product basis, too. If your new visitors’ bounce rate is high or their site duration is low, you may need to adjust your strategy.

The middle of the funnel, also known as the consideration stage, is where prospects are evaluating whether your product or service is right for them. Marketers will want to start focusing on converting their customers into paying accounts in this stage.

Number of conversions: The total number of conversions driven by a campaign. Prospects at this stage are already aware of your brand and your content. Use retargeting to convince them to convert and adjust your campaigns based on how many of them actually do.

View-through conversions (VTCs): Conversions that resulted from customers who viewed ads but did not click. The truth is, no one likes clicking ads — but that doesn’t mean they don’t influence conversions.

Once prospects arrive on your site, take a look at how many of them convert after being served an ad — even if they never clicked one — to get a fair and accurate picture of the effectiveness of each ad

Attributed closed deals and new sales: The total number of deals closed from prospective customers who interacted with an advertising campaign. In addition to the total number of conversions, you should measure campaigns at the middle of the funnel by the number and quality of deals they’re closing — as well as the number of new sales and overall new customers that they drive.

Cost-per-acquisition (CPA): Your overall campaign spend divided by the total number of conversions. CPA is an important KPI to keep track of across the entire funnel, as a helpful proxy for how effective your teams are at closing, retaining, and cultivating customers.

 

Also known as the decision stage, this is the stage where prospects are deciding from whom they want to buy. As a marketer, you want to focus on closing deals that grow your customer base, while also up-selling or cross selling existing customers. KPIs at the bottom of the funnel help marketers evaluate the ultimate revenue consequences of their efforts.

ROI and LTV

Return on investment (ROI): The net profit generated by your campaign, calculated as the difference between the total revenue the campaign generated and the total cost of running the campaign.

Lifetime value (LTV): The net profit attributed to a customer over their lifetime. There are many ways to calculate LTV, but a model that is tailored to the specifics of your sales cycle will be most effective. LTV is important because it helps marketers calculate their ROI over time.

How to Calculate LTV

LTV = (AVERAGE MARGIN PER ORDER X REPEAT SALES FREQUENCY X AVERAGE RETENTION TIME)

Example: $300 = ($100 x 0.5 purchases per month x 6 months) – Lifetime value is $300.

In this first equation, we’re shown how to calculate the lifetime value of a customer. Here we’re looking at the average margin per order, the repeat sales frequency, and the average retention time. Let’s break this down.

Average margin per order means the average amount of money a company brings in after processing and delivering a product. The next two metrics are meant to determine how often someone will purchase your products throughout the entire time they remain your customer. When combining these metrics, we were able to determine a LTV of $300.

How to Calculate ROI

ROI = (LTV-CPA)

Example:

LTV = $300 (calculated above)
CPA = $50 (what we pay to “buy” high-quality customers)
ROI = ($300-$50)

OVERALL ROI IS $250, A 400% INCREASE ON THE CPA

For this example, the situation is reversed. Here we already know the LTV, but are looking at understanding the return on investment of our advertising efforts. For this equation, we’ll look at the lifetime value minus the total cost to acquire a new customer (CPA).

Here we see that it cost $50 to acquire one single new customer and this customer had an LTV of $300 (taken from above). Once we subtract the CPA, we reveal an ROI that is 400% higher. Quite an improvement.

By gaining a deep understanding of the LTV of your average customer, and using that metric to determine how much to spend to get them to convert, you can get a more accurate sense of what your ROI is for your ad campaigns.

Why Do KPIs Matter? 

The Short Answer: Attribution

Attribution is critical because it allows marketers to evaluate what ads or marketing efforts are driving results and measure the impact of their advertising. Yearly trends continue to show that marketers (and their bosses) are placing more and more importance on marketing analytics and attribution.

AdRoll’s recent State of Performance Marketing Report found that almost 75% of marketers believe attribution is critical or very important to marketing success. Over 40% said that they spend the lion’s share of their yearly budgets on campaign measurement.


Despite this influx of interest, many marketers continue to exclusively track ad clicks to measure their campaigns. Tracking ad clicks alone completely misses a large portion of your audience — those who don’t click on ads, but may still be influenced to convert later.

Why Last Click Doesn’t Tell the Whole Story

  • A small portion of people click on ads: Only 16% of users click on ads, and half of those — 8% — account for 85% of all clicks on display ads. This means that this pool of what the industry calls “natural born clickers” is the only audience you track.
  • Last-click tracking incentivizes finding users who would buy without advertising: Last-click attribution models are fundamentally incentivized to find users already likely to purchase—a practice referred to to as “funnel jumping.” Ideally, advertising should influence users to consider purchasing a product or service they wouldn’t otherwise have been exposed to.
  • Credit is not accurately assigned across publishers: last-click gives all the credit to the final click and ignores any other marketing that occurred before the purchase. This means any previous messaging users were exposed to, in addition to any content they consumed that discussed your brand, isn’t appropriately valued.

In fact, in the same survey almost 65% of respondents said that they currently employ a click-based attribution model. However, over 90% of them said that they plan to or are considering changing their attribution model in 2017 — signifying a large shift away from click-based attribution in the coming year.

The Alternative

Unlike click-based attribution models, blended attribution allows marketers to take into account both views and clicks when measuring the success of their campaigns. This metric retains the simplicity and immediacy of click-based attribution while accounting for the cumulative effect of views. More importantly, it takes into account what advertisers have always known: that viewing ads influences consumer behavior.

By combining views and clicks, we reveal a more nuanced, and ultimately more accurate, picture of how advertising affects users. This helps marketers allocate their budget and take into account all the effort that goes into both media planning and creative development.

Want to learn how to create your own ads? Click here to access the complete guide: Display Ads & Inbound Marketing

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Source: blog.hubspot.com/marketing

Women Shave Because of Marketers: How the Industry Created Demand for Women's Razors

womens-razors-marketing-compressed.jpg

If you’ve spent time in front of a television lately, you’re probably familiar with the formula for many women’s razor ads: A woman shaves and gets glowing legs that attract positive attention from her male counterpart. You can see the formula at work here, here, and here.

If you roll your eyes when you watch these ads, you’re not alone. But this formula has been highly lucrative for more than a century.

Effective advertising taps into the viewer’s emotions to compel them to take an action with a product. And in the case of the women’s razor and shaving industry, product messaging and ad campaigns tapped into emotions like shame, fear, and love to create an entirely new market and demand for a product previously restricted only to men.

Today, women in the United States spend roughly $1 billion dollars on razors per year — and it’s estimated that women spend between $10,000 and $23,000 on hair removal over the course of their lifetimes. Personal care trends come and go, but this one’s been growing for the last 100 years. Let’s dive into how marketers used effective advertising to get women to change their grooming routines — and budgets — forever.

The History of Women’s Razor Marketing

1910s: Armpit Hair Is Embarrassing

With the 1901 invention of the safety razor and the U.S. Army contract to supply every soldier with a razor, Gillette was a household name at the beginning of the 20th century — but it was only being used by men. Women’s fashion was starting to transition from 19th century-era buttoned-up, conservative gowns to more relaxed sleeveless dresses for dancing and going outside.

Then, when Gillette created the first women’s razor in 1915, it took advantage of the advertising opportunity presented by more exposed skin. Below is the first ad for Gillette’s Milady Décolleté that specifically targeted underarm hair shaving in 1917:

gillette-womens-razor-1.jpg

The ad copy effectively makes women feel embarrassed and left out of the trend if they aren’t already shaving their underarms. The razor “solves an embarrassing personal problem” and is “welcomed by women everywhere. Gillette used its product to create a problem and provide the solution — a genius marketing strategy, if you ask us.

In another ad, Gillette posits its razor as serving “the modern woman” to further convince women to start using its product or be left behind. The tagline drives home the importance of buying a razor and shaving: “A Refinement which has become a Modern Necessity.” It acknowledges the novelty but emphasizes the urgent need for women to start shaving.

gillette-razor-ad-2.png

1920s: Shorter Hemlines Mean Shorter Hair

During the 1920s, flapper dresses got shorter, and women even started swimming in more revealing bathing costumes that started to show off other body parts that could be shaved. In 1922, Harper’s Bazaar ran one of the first magazine ads specifically targeting underarm hair:

1922harpersad.png

Magazines were consumed during this era for fashion advice, household tips, and women’s advice, so a spread like this signaled to readers the continued importance of underarm hair removal.

During this period, magazines also started targeting leg hair removal. In Christine Hope’s paper, “Caucasian Female Body Hair and American Culture,” Hope surveyed older editions of Harper’s Bazaar and found that 66% of ads mentioned leg hair removal and that most ads ran seasonally during summer months when women exposed more skin.

1940s: No Nylons, No Problem

By the time the 1940s rolled around, leg hair removal had become more ubiquitous. All hair removal ads in Harper’s Bazaar mentioned leg hair, and 56% of ads were specifically about leg hair removal.

Then, during World War II, there was a shortage of nylon used to make stockings, which drove more women to shave their legs and use depilatories so they could go bare-legged. Remington started selling the first electric women’s razor, which was presented as a faster alternative to manual shaving and keeping legs bare.

1950s: Hairlessness Is Classy and Feminine

Once leg and underarm shaving was more widely accepted, advertisers started using language and imagery to conflate shaving and hairlessness with femininity and classiness. In the ad below, the “Debutante” makes the razor an aspirational, ladylike product women feel like they have to buy.

debutante-razor-ad.jpg

1960s: Shaving Is Normal

By 1964, 98% of American women between the ages of 15 and 44 reported they removed some body hair, and advertisers were determined to make sure that number inched up to 100%. Ads featured shaming and scare tactics to get all women on board with the shaving trend.

scaredy-kit-ad.png

The ad is designed to make women feel more comfortable with shaving by advertising a starter kit, but some of the copy is a little more intimidating: “Stop shaking. Sharp blades give you the best shave.” It’s meant to challenge readers to woman up and use Gillette to shave their legs — and it worked.

1980s: Shaving Is Sexy

1980s razor advertising seemed to be focused on women shaving to make themselves hairless to be more appealing to men — just check out Gillette’s “Just Whistle” ad below.

just-whistle-ad.jpg

Subtle, huh?

1990s-2000s: Shaving Everywhere Is Normal

In the 1990s and 2000s, ads and commercials shifted to tell women about the importance of shaving to keep their entire bodies hairless — still to the appeal of men — for all of the occasions when they’re in short skirt, swimsuits, or wearing nothing at all. Razors bore new features to shave legs and bikini lines, adding to the list of body parts ads encouraged women to shave.

2010s: Shaving Needs to be Disrupted

Nowadays, razors are an expensive industry — especially for women. Women’s razors are subject to the “pink tax,” wherein women’s products are more expensive than the male versions despite identical functionalities. The disposable razor market is worth $34 billion and isn’t environmentally ideal, so other companies are trying to compete with the giants like Gillette and Schick. On-demand services, such as Dollar Shave Club and Harry’s, are advertising razors primarily to men, but the products are unisex, and the ads appeal to different motives — like price, convenience, and a better solution to traditional razor shopping.

If You Build it, They Will Shave

Razor companies used fear, shame, loneliness, and sex appeal to create a massive women’s shaving industry from scratch. And however frustrating that is for the modern buyer, women’s razors are a fascinating case of effective emotional advertising. It will be interesting to see if newer, on-demand razor companies can disrupt such an entrenched industry, and we’ll keep you posted on more fun ads from disruptors like DSC.

Can you think of other industries that were created with the help of marketing and advertising? Share with us in the comments below.

Image Credit: Razor Archive, Farmer’s Wife, Vox, Bustle

marketing-campaigns

Source: Women Shave Because of Marketers: How the Industry Created Demand for Women's Razors
blog.hubspot.com/marketing

Women Shave Because of Marketers: How the Industry Created Demand for Women's Razors

womens-razors-marketing-compressed.jpg

If you’ve spent time in front of a television lately, you’re probably familiar with the formula for many women’s razor ads: A woman shaves and gets glowing legs that attract positive attention from her male counterpart. You can see the formula at work here, here, and here.

If you roll your eyes when you watch these ads, you’re not alone. But this formula has been highly lucrative for more than a century.

Effective advertising taps into the viewer’s emotions to compel them to take an action with a product. And in the case of the women’s razor and shaving industry, product messaging and ad campaigns tapped into emotions like shame, fear, and love to create an entirely new market and demand for a product previously restricted only to men.

Today, women in the United States spend roughly $1 billion dollars on razors per year — and it’s estimated that women spend between $10,000 and $23,000 on hair removal over the course of their lifetimes. Personal care trends come and go, but this one’s been growing for the last 100 years. Let’s dive into how marketers used effective advertising to get women to change their grooming routines — and budgets — forever.

The History of Women’s Razor Marketing

1910s: Armpit Hair Is Embarrassing

With the 1901 invention of the safety razor and the U.S. Army contract to supply every soldier with a razor, Gillette was a household name at the beginning of the 20th century — but it was only being used by men. Women’s fashion was starting to transition from 19th century-era buttoned-up, conservative gowns to more relaxed sleeveless dresses for dancing and going outside.

Then, when Gillette created the first women’s razor in 1915, it took advantage of the advertising opportunity presented by more exposed skin. Below is the first ad for Gillette’s Milady Décolleté that specifically targeted underarm hair shaving in 1917:

gillette-womens-razor-1.jpg

The ad copy effectively makes women feel embarrassed and left out of the trend if they aren’t already shaving their underarms. The razor “solves an embarrassing personal problem” and is “welcomed by women everywhere. Gillette used its product to create a problem and provide the solution — a genius marketing strategy, if you ask us.

In another ad, Gillette posits its razor as serving “the modern woman” to further convince women to start using its product or be left behind. The tagline drives home the importance of buying a razor and shaving: “A Refinement which has become a Modern Necessity.” It acknowledges the novelty but emphasizes the urgent need for women to start shaving.

gillette-razor-ad-2.png

1920s: Shorter Hemlines Mean Shorter Hair

During the 1920s, flapper dresses got shorter, and women even started swimming in more revealing bathing costumes that started to show off other body parts that could be shaved. In 1922, Harper’s Bazaar ran one of the first magazine ads specifically targeting underarm hair:

1922harpersad.png

Magazines were consumed during this era for fashion advice, household tips, and women’s advice, so a spread like this signaled to readers the continued importance of underarm hair removal.

During this period, magazines also started targeting leg hair removal. In Christine Hope’s paper, “Caucasian Female Body Hair and American Culture,” Hope surveyed older editions of Harper’s Bazaar and found that 66% of ads mentioned leg hair removal and that most ads ran seasonally during summer months when women exposed more skin.

1940s: No Nylons, No Problem

By the time the 1940s rolled around, leg hair removal had become more ubiquitous. All hair removal ads in Harper’s Bazaar mentioned leg hair, and 56% of ads were specifically about leg hair removal.

Then, during World War II, there was a shortage of nylon used to make stockings, which drove more women to shave their legs and use depilatories so they could go bare-legged. Remington started selling the first electric women’s razor, which was presented as a faster alternative to manual shaving and keeping legs bare.

1950s: Hairlessness Is Classy and Feminine

Once leg and underarm shaving was more widely accepted, advertisers started using language and imagery to conflate shaving and hairlessness with femininity and classiness. In the ad below, the “Debutante” makes the razor an aspirational, ladylike product women feel like they have to buy.

debutante-razor-ad.jpg

1960s: Shaving Is Normal

By 1964, 98% of American women between the ages of 15 and 44 reported they removed some body hair, and advertisers were determined to make sure that number inched up to 100%. Ads featured shaming and scare tactics to get all women on board with the shaving trend.

scaredy-kit-ad.png

The ad is designed to make women feel more comfortable with shaving by advertising a starter kit, but some of the copy is a little more intimidating: “Stop shaking. Sharp blades give you the best shave.” It’s meant to challenge readers to woman up and use Gillette to shave their legs — and it worked.

1980s: Shaving Is Sexy

1980s razor advertising seemed to be focused on women shaving to make themselves hairless to be more appealing to men — just check out Gillette’s “Just Whistle” ad below.

just-whistle-ad.jpg

Subtle, huh?

1990s-2000s: Shaving Everywhere Is Normal

In the 1990s and 2000s, ads and commercials shifted to tell women about the importance of shaving to keep their entire bodies hairless — still to the appeal of men — for all of the occasions when they’re in short skirt, swimsuits, or wearing nothing at all. Razors bore new features to shave legs and bikini lines, adding to the list of body parts ads encouraged women to shave.

2010s: Shaving Needs to be Disrupted

Nowadays, razors are an expensive industry — especially for women. Women’s razors are subject to the “pink tax,” wherein women’s products are more expensive than the male versions despite identical functionalities. The disposable razor market is worth $34 billion and isn’t environmentally ideal, so other companies are trying to compete with the giants like Gillette and Schick. On-demand services, such as Dollar Shave Club and Harry’s, are advertising razors primarily to men, but the products are unisex, and the ads appeal to different motives — like price, convenience, and a better solution to traditional razor shopping.

If You Build it, They Will Shave

Razor companies used fear, shame, loneliness, and sex appeal to create a massive women’s shaving industry from scratch. And however frustrating that is for the modern buyer, women’s razors are a fascinating case of effective emotional advertising. It will be interesting to see if newer, on-demand razor companies can disrupt such an entrenched industry, and we’ll keep you posted on more fun ads from disruptors like DSC.

Can you think of other industries that were created with the help of marketing and advertising? Share with us in the comments below.

Image Credit: Razor Archive, Farmer’s Wife, Vox, Bustle

marketing-campaigns

Source: Women Shave Because of Marketers: How the Industry Created Demand for Women's Razors
blog.hubspot.com/marketing